Updates and Errata, 1st edition

PUERTO RICO'S BIRDS IN PHOTOGRAPHS
1st edition, 1999 by Mark W. Oberle

---Page 2: Address for Editorial Humanitas: 2006 23 Ave. East, Seattle, WA 98112.
---Page 9: The Smithsonian website on shade grown coffee has changed to: http://natzoo.si.edu/smbc/Research/Coffee/coffee.htm.
---Page 15: Puerto Rican Sceech-Owl is now in the genus Megascops.
---Page 23: The Spanish name for Dendroica angelae should be Reinita de Bosque Enano, and the English spelling has been changed to Elfin-woods Warbler.
---Page 43: Reddish Egret weight is 700-850 g.
---Page 44: Roseate Spoonbill is now in the genus Platalea.
---Page 48: Population of White-cheeked Pintail is estimated as about 1,000 birds.
---Page 57: Purple Gallinule is now in the genus Porphyrio.
---Page 67: The photo next to the Semipalmated Sandpiper text is of a Least Sandpiper. The Semipalmated Sandpiper has black legs and a tubular bill.
---Page 70: The Common Snipe has been split into 2 species. The species in the West Indies is now called Wilson's Snipe, Gallinago delicata.
---Page 74: The Latin name for the Sandwich Tern should be Sterna sandvicensis.
---
Page 75: The Latin name for the Least Tern should be Sterna antillarum.
---Page 77: The English name for Rock Dove has changed to Rock Pigeon.
---Page 78-79: White-crowned Pigeon, Scaly-naped Pigeon and Plain Pigeon are now in the genus Patagioenas.
---Page 82: Mourning Dove weight is 108 g.
---Page 84: Above the Bridled Quail-Dove text is a Key West Quail-Dove photo. For a Bridled Quail-Dove photo, see:
http://www.kingsnake.com/westindian/ (Avifauna). ---Page 70: The Common Snipe has been split into 2 species. The species in the West Indies is now called Wilson's Snipe, Gallinago delicata.
---Page 88: Antillean Nighthawk weight is 50 g.

---Page 106: Adelaide’s Warbler has been split into 3 species, with the endemic species on Puerto Rico retaining the original English and Latin names.
---Page 111. The Latin name for Ovenbird has changed to Seiurus aurocapilla.
---Page 113: The Stripe-headed Tanager has been split into 4 species, with the "new" endemic species on Puerto Rico being called the Puerto Rican Spindalis, Spindalis portoricensis.
---Page 116: The Latin name for Grasshopper Sparrow should be Ammodramus savannarum.
---Page 119: The Black-cowled Oriole has been split into 2 species. The species in the West Indies is called the Greater Antillean Oriole, Icterus dominicensis.
---Page 122: The Warbling Silverbill has been split into 2 species. The form on Puerto Rico is called the Indian Silverbill, Lonchura malabarica.
---Page 124: The Chestnut Mannikin has been split into 2 species. The form on Puerto Rico is called the Tricolored Munia, Lonchura malacca.


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---Pages 2 and 52: The photographer of the Sharp-shinned Hawk should be listed as Carlos Delannoy.
---Page 57: The photographer of the Common Moorhen should be listed as Bruce Hallett.
---Page 75: The Least Tern photograph should be attributed to Bruce Hallett.
---Page 76: The Sooty Tern photograph should be attributed to Jorge Saliva.
---Page 126:
Fideicomiso de Conservación (Conservation Trust of Puerto Rico)
155 Calle Tetuan
Apartado Postal 9023554
San Juan, PR 00901
787-722-5834

Sociedad Ornitológica Puertorriqeña
P.O. Box 195166
San Juan, PR 00919-5166
http://www.avesdepuertorico.org/

---The following photographs should be attributed to James Parnell:
page 8: Brown Pelican;
page 72: Gull-billed Tern;
page 73: Royal Tern;
page 74: Sandwich Tern.

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On the CD-ROM only:
The Blue Grosbeak is now in the genus Passerina.
Red Phalaraope is now Phalaropus fulicarius.

The second edition of this book is now available with improved photos and a Spanish and English CD-ROM containing 1,600 photos, plus 270 audio clips. A Spanish edition of the book without CD-ROM is also available: Las Aves de Puerto Rico en Fotografías. 2003, Translation by José Placer. ISBN 0-9650104-2-2

Updated 1 June 2006

 
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